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Waub-o-jeeg, also written Wa-bo-jeeg or other variants of Waabojiig (White Fisher) (c. 1747-1793) was a famous warrior and chief of the . He was born into the Adik (caribou) some time in the mid-18th century near on the western end of . His father was also a noted warrior, who fought for the in the . Although Wabojeeg's family had intermarried with the people during times of peace, and he had several Dakota relatives, including the famous chief , he fought in several battles against the Dakota and during his lifetime. His children, notably his son (the renewer) and his youngest daughter , became prominent in the area, a major post.

Waub-ojeeg distrusted white men because of their encroachment on Native territory. When , a young fur trader, fell in love with his eldest daughter, , and asked the chief to be allowed to marry her. Waub-o-jeeg at first refused, saying: "White Man, I have noticed your behaviour, it has been correct; but, White Man, your colour is deceitful. Of you, may I expect better things? You say you are going to ; go, and if you return I shall be satisfied of your sincerity and will give you my daughter."

While a respected warrior, Waub-ojeeg was also known for his poetry. He created "Waub-ojeeg's Battle Song", which his son-in-law John Johnston translated into English:

"On that day when our heroes lay low, lay low,
On that day when our heroes lay low
I fought by their side, and thought, ere I died,
Just vengeance to take on the foe,
Just vengeance to take on the foe.

On that day, when our chieftains lay dead, lay dead,
On that day, when our chieftains lay dead,
I fought hand to hand at the head of my band,
And here on my breast have I bled, have I bled,
And here on my breast have I bled.

Our chiefs shall return no more, no more,
Our chiefs shall return no more -
Nor their brethren of war, who can show scar for scar,
Like women their fates shall deplore, deplore,
Like women their fates shall deplore.

Five winters in hunting we'll spend, we'll spend,
Five winters in hunting we'll spend,
Till our youth, grown to men, we'll to the war lead again,
And our days like our fathers' will end, will end,
And our days like our fathers' will end. peoples, first voices penny petrone&source=gbs_navlinks_s Penny Petrone, First People, First Voices'', University of Toronto Press: (1984), p. 28

  • Neill, Edward S., History of the Ojibways, and their Connection with Fur Traders, based upon official and other Records, Collections of the Minnesota Historical Society 5 (St. Paul 1885) 447-48
  • Schoolcraft, Henry R. (1821). A Narrative Journal of Travels Through the Northwestern Regions...to the Sources of the Mississippi River. Vol. II
  • Schoolcraft, Henry R. (1851). Thirty Years with the Indian Tribes
  • Warren, William W. (1851). History of the Ojibway People.
  • Brazer, Marjorie Cahn (1993). Harps Upon the Willows: The Johnston Family of the Old Northwest, ISBN 1-880311-02-X.

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