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   » » BarcodeComment: Abrasive-stone-knife-oil-dislodged-edge-3669563094

Norton 87935 6" Premium Tool & Knife Sharpener (Misc.)

Norton 87935 6" Arkansas Translucent Benchstone Selling Unit: Card Features: Knife and tool sharpener Designed for fast sharpening of high quality steel tools and knives Use with carving tools, specialty knives, scissors, precision tools, and delicate instruments Coarse and fine grit Lubricate with Norton Sharpening Oil #87940 for best results Oil acts as an effective lubricant during sharpening to float away metal and abrasive dust that would otherwise clog up the stone and ultimately render..
2.0 out of 5 stars
You can get this exact item at Home Depot for about 5 dollars. Never pay 20 for this.

I was a little surprised that an oil stone like this produces a larger slurry than my King waterstone. A "slurry" is basically a big cloud of abrasive that's been removed from the stone itself by the blade when sharpening. As you make passes with your knife blade against the stone, the steel is actually dislodging abrasive from the stone. This dislodged abrasive accumulates in the oil and you'll notice that the oil becomes cloudy: that's the dislodged abrasive. Now, why is this bad? Because that big cloud of abrasive in the oil is ramming against your knife edge as you're doing your passes, which means that its simultaneously dulling your edge as you try and sharpen it against the actual stone!

Slurrys are desirable if your are just working the edge of your knife as abrasive being dislodged means fresh abrasive is being produced on the stone's surface, meaning that it...Read more

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You can get this exact item at Home Depot for about 5 dollars. Never pay 20 for this.I was a little surprised that an oil stone like this produces a larger slurry than my King waterstone. A "slurry" is basically a big cloud of abrasive that's been removed from the stone itself by the blade when sharpening. As you make passes with your knife blade against the stone, the steel is actually dislodging abrasive from the stone. This dislodged abrasive accumulates in the oil and you'll notice that the oil becomes cloudy: that's the dislodged abrasive. Now, why is this bad? Because that big cloud of abrasive in the oil is ramming against your knife edge as you're doing your passes, which means that its simultaneously dulling your edge as you try and sharpen it against the actual stone!Slurrys are desirable if your are just working the edge of your knife as abrasive being dislodged means fresh abrasive is being produced on the stone's surface, meaning that it...Read more
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